A (Working) Definition of God

I believe in the Triune God. As a Tri-Personal Being, He is the Maker and Lord of the heavens and the earth. He is self-existent, self-sufficient, and absolutely free. He is simple, united, perfect, immutable, and passible. He is infinite, eternal, omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent. God is gloriously and happily true, wise, holy, just, good, faithful, love, and merciful. He is a missional God, who owns the universe and everything therein. He is a divine mystery, yet revealer of himself. The primary names of God include: Elohim, Adonai, and YHWH.

I believe in God who is the Holy Trinity. God is one God, yet he is three Persons in Divine Community, in Perichoresis. The Father is God. The Son is God. The Spirit is God. The Father is Lover, the Son is the Beloved, the Spirit is Love. The Trinity is a missional God. He is both an immanent and an economic Trinity. Each Person of the Trinity is equal in being or existence. The Son is a revealer of the Father, who is the Creator of all things. He is both a revealer and a concealer of knowledge. The Father is the fons divinitates. The Son is the Creator and Sustainer of all things. He is even the eternal life, who was in the beginning with God, being very God himself. Jesus, the Son of God was and is both God and man. The Spirit is the Creator of all things, and is the Perfecter of creation.

I believe in this Triune God, in order to understand him. From whence does the knowledge of God come? The sources of this knowledge are: special revelation; general revelation; And, the law of this God is written on the hearts of all people. As well, God himself imparts knowledge of himself to those whom he so chooses.

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5 thoughts on “A (Working) Definition of God

  1. Why don’t you read the bible.
    your basis of your belief are base solely on the doctrine of the group to which you affiliated with, and not in the bible, to which you should have to base your belief.

    You only have one soul, and if you trusted that to a wrong group, you will never have a chance to have it back again. So while there is somebody still advising you, try to find the Right Path. READ THE BIBLE. Don’t be lazy.

    FYI, the belief that God is omnicient, omnipotent, omnipresent are doctrines of morons of the bible. And Also, about the belief that God is Triune is also doctrine of morons. Ask your mentor, where can he find in the bible that stated that the Holy Ghost is a God.
    Also, you stated that the three are equal in being or existence.
    Understand the ff. verses.
    1. For the Father is greater than I ( John 14:28)
    2. Jesus was sent by his Father ( John 3:17;4:34 ; 5:24 ,30 ;5:37)
    3.The Holy Ghost will be sent by Jesus (John 16:17)
    Take note of this verse:
    Verily , verily, I say unto you, the servant IS NOT GREATER than his lord; Neither he that IS SENT greater than he that sent him.(John 13:16)

    So I hope you will find the truth.

  2. I believe in the Triune God.[1] As a Tri-Personal Being, He is the Maker[2] and Lord of the heavens and the earth. He is self-existent,[3] self-sufficient,[4] and absolutely free.[5] He is simple,[6] united,[7] perfect,[8] immutable,[9] and passible.[10] He is infinite,[11] eternal,[12] omniscient,[13] omnipotent,[14] and omnipresent.[15] God is gloriously[16] and happily[17] true,[18] wise,[19] holy,[20] just,[21] good,[22] faithful,[23] love,[24] and merciful.[25] He is a missional God,[26] who owns the universe and everything therein.[27] He is a divine mystery, yet revealer of himself.[28] The primary names of God include: Elohim,[29] Adonai,[30] and YHWH.[31]

    I believe in God who is the Holy Trinity.[32] God is one God,[33] yet he is three Persons in Divine Community,[34] in Perichoresis.[35] The Father is God. The Son is God. The Spirit is God.[36] The Father is Lover, the Son is the Beloved, the Spirit is Love.[37] The Trinity is a missional God.[38] God is both an immanent and an economic Trinity.[39] Each Person of the Trinity is equal in being or existence.[40] The Son is a revealer of the Father,[41] who is the Creator of all things.[42] He is both a revealer and a concealer of knowledge.[43] The Father is the fons divinitates.[44] The Son is the Creator and Sustainer of all things.[45] He is even the eternal life,[46] who was in the beginning with God, being very God himself.[47] Jesus, the Son of God was and is both God and man.[48] The Spirit is the Creator of all things,[49] and is the Perfecter of creation.[50]

    I believe in this Triune God, in order to understand him.[51] From whence does the knowledge of God come? The sources of this knowledge are: special revelation;[52] general revelation;[53] And, the law of this God is written on the hearts of all people.[54] As well, God himself imparts knowledge of himself to those whom he so chooses.[55]

    [Endnotes:]
    [1] This section intends to emphasize God’s oneness and unity, while at the same time declaring his being in three Persons. Wayne Grudem defines the unity of God like this: “God is not divided into parts, yet we see different attributes of God emphasized at different times.” He acknowledges, as well, “that this attribute of God has also been called God’s simplicity, using simple in the less common sense of ‘not complex’ or ‘not composed of parts.’” W. Grudem, Systematic Theology (Zondervan, 2000) 177.
    [2] Adapted from the first stanza of the Apostles’ Creed: “I believe in God, the Father Almighty, the Maker of heaven and earth…”; Gen 1:1; Acts 17:24; In the tradition of St. Irenaeus of Lyons and Colin Gunton, I ascribe to the imagery or metaphorical language describing God as having ‘two hands’ to create the universe. Thus, “Irenaeus frequently says that God creates by means of his two hands, the Son and the Spirit…. That is, because the Son and the Spirit are God, to create by means of his two hands means that God is himself creating.” C. Gunton, The Triune Creator (Eerdmans, 1998) 54. In addition, being the Maker of heaven and earth, implies his being the One who has made all things which are included therein. Assumed here, as well, in referring to the Christian doctrine of creation, is that God created ex nihilo, that is, out of nothing, rather than from some eternally pre-existent matter.
    [3] Another sense from the term, Aseity, “from himself.” According to Horrell, this “means that God does not derive from or depend on anything outside of himself.” J. Scott Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Names & Attributes of God, p. 8. See also Isa 40:12-28; Jn 5:26; 1Ti 6:13,15-16.
    [4] Horrell notes worthily: “Nothing is lacking within God himself. While Wayne Grudem uses the term ‘independence’ [see below] for both this and the above aspect [self-existence] of God, his definition fits especially the idea of self-sufficiency.” Ibid. See also Ac 17:24-25; Job 41:11; Ps 50:10-12; 90:2; Rev 4:11. Indeed, all three of these attributes (self-existence, self-sufficiency, and freedom) must necessarily be inter-related. If God is not one, he cannot be either one of the other two.
    [5] There are at least two senses in which God is free: 1) God is independent, in that, he “does not need us or the rest of creation for anything, yet we and the rest of creation can glorify him and bring him joy.” This attribute is sometimes referred to as God’s self-existence or aseity. 2) God is independent or free to do whatever he pleases. W. Grudem, Systematic Theology (Zondervan, 2000) 160, 216. In the latter sense, Piper says, “if God is not under constraint by forces outside himself to act contrary to his good pleasure, but rather acts only out of the overflow of the joy of his boundless self-sufficiency, then all his acts are the expression of joy and he has pleasure in all that he does.” J. Piper, The Pleasures of God (Multnomah, 2000) 51. See also Ps 115:3; Isa 40:12-28; Da 4:35.
    [6] Harmony is probably the more helpful word here to describe the divine nature “rather than dichotomies, tensions or contradictions (e.g., love vs. holiness).” J. Scott Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Names & Attributes of God, p. 9. As a more rounded example: As God is love, he is holy love. God’s attributes complement one another rather than bring tension within his being.
    [7] Simply stated, God is one. Horrell explains: “Related to the simplicity of God is the divine unity itself. Each of the three persons shares precisely the same characteristics because, together, they constitute the one infinite God.” Ibid. See also Dt 6:4; Isa 43:10; 1Co 8:4; 1Ti 2:5; Jas 2:19, as well as the endnote corresponding with the first subject heading of the main text.
    [8] God is the supreme standard of excellence in being in general as well as being in morality. See also Hab 1:13; 1Ti 4:4; 1Jn 1:5. Ibid.
    [9] Contra Aristotle, who defined God as the Immovable Mover, “the God of the Bible is stable but not static.” Indeed, throughout redemptive history, “the divine persons live in dynamic relationship with one another and with all creation.” Ibid. In addition, God reflective of the image the stoics or deists portray him to be.
    [10] This term answers the question as to whether or not God has passions (or, emotions). The Bible answers positively, although carefully so. Indeed, “the Triune God reflects a fullness of balanced emotions, without caprice or uncontrolled passions.” Ibid. Yet, we must recognize that even when God’s emotions are displayed in some manner or another, he remains supremely sovereign in his interaction with humanity throughout redemptive history in the way that his plans are not thwarted or frustrated.
    [11] To further illustrate God’s simplicity, etc. with this term in particular, his being infinite describes the depth and magnitude of his attributes and perfections. For instance, God is infinitely holy and infinitely powerful. His holiness and power has no limits in degree of quality or quantity.
    [12] Well related to his infinity with regards to time, God’s eternality describes his being outside time as human beings perceive time. In other words, he is not confined to our concept and reality of time, though he does indeed interact with humanity as within space and time. See also Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Names & Attributes of God, p. 12.
    [13] God knowledge is infinite. That is, his knowledge is unsearchable and unlimited. Contra the belief of open theists, “God knows all past, present and future, together with the trillions of possibilities and contingencies.” Ibid. See also Isa 46:10; Job 11:7-9; Ps 139:1-6,16; Heb 4:13.
    [14] Likewise, God is infinite in strength, power, and control over all creation, visible and invisible. See also Rev 4:11; Ps 135:5-6; Jer 32:17; Heb 2:10.
    [15] Likewise inter-related with God’s infinity, he is without limits in being present everywhere. That is, God is present in all places of his creation, visible and invisible. As Horrell notes: “God exists instantaneously inside and outside the dimensions of finites existence.” With this in mind, I believe there is a sense in which God is both transcendent as well as immanent. “Transcendence means that God is distinct, above and separate from all earthly and heavenly creation, unknowable apart from his graceful self-revelation. Immanence signifies that God is everywhere present within creation, sustaining it by his presence and power, yet unconfused with it.” Ibid., 16
    [16] Similar to God’s holiness with regards to his simplicity, God is glorious in all his perfections and attributes. The glory of God has at least two different senses of meaning: 1) to ascribe “that internal great and excellent good”; 2) “signifies the communications of God’s fullness, and means much thing with God’s abundant and exceeding goodness and grace.” J. Edwards, The Works of Jonathan Edwards; v. 8, edited by Paul Ramsey (Yale University, 1989) 514, 518. So, when God is described to be wise and true, he is gloriously so.
    [17] God as infinitely happy relates to his being self-existent, self-sufficient, and free, as described earlier. Probably the more precise biblical word here is blessed. “God’s blessedness means that God delights fully in himself and in all that reflects his character.” Indeed, “God takes pleasure in creation that mirrors his own excellence.” W. Grudem, Systematic Theology (Zondervan, 2000) 160, 218.
    [18] As the ultimate and final standard in all things, God is the very being of truth, from whom comes only actions which are true and wise and just and good. See also Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Names & Attributes of God, p. 19, as well as Isa 45:18-19; Jer 10:10-11; Jn 17:3.
    [19] Related to his being true and right, though here, in a more thoroughly practical sense. He is infinitely wise. Ibid.
    [20] As noted earlier, God’s holiness seems to envelope all his other perfections and attributes. This attributes signifies God’s infinite uniqueness, separation from sin and evil, and beauty (aesthetical and moral). Ibid., 20. See also Isa 6; Heb 2:11; Ps 71:22.
    [21] The justness of God is a necessary consequence of his being holy and true, etc. A related characteristic is righteousness. “There is a sense in which, just as profoundly God loves that which is good, he equally hates that which is evil—that which is opposed both to his own character but also to the entire creation be made ‘good.’” Ibid. Also see Rev 15:3-4; Dt 32:4.
    [22] Equal to benevolence. “A good person is one who acts to benefit others. Benevolence is part of righteousness, but a part that Scripture often singles out. God is the chief example of goodness.” J. Frame, The Doctrine of God (P&R, 2002) 410. See also Ge 50:20; Ps 34:8-10; James 1:17.
    [23] So, Horrell: “A corollary of divine goodness (and truth) is God’s faithfulness, his benevolent consistency” on his peoples’ behalf, and for his name’s sake. Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Names & Attributes of God, p. 21. See also Ps 25:10; 33:4.
    [24] As 1 John 4:16 shows, “God’s love denotes his eternal self-givingness to others.” Ibid. See also Romans 8 and 5, as well as D.A. Carson’s five levels of love in his book, The Difficult Doctrine of the Love of God.
    [25] Here, God withholds that punishment which sinners justly deserve. This attribute is often coupled with God’s grace. Ibid., 22. See also Ex 34:6; Ps 103:8.
    [26] Gen 1:28; In this sense of God being missional, he gave male and female (whom he created in his own image) the first great commission. That is, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion…over every living thing…”
    [27] Gen 14:22; Ps 24:1; 50:12; Job 41:11; By virtue of God’s creation of the universe and everything therein, implies his ownership of them.
    [28] Hans Urs von Balthasar states, “A purely transcendent God (if there could be such) would be an abstract, purely negative mystery. By contrast, a God who is able to be immanent while remaining transcendent is a concrete and positive mystery: as he draws near to us, we begin to realize how high he is above us; and as he unveils himself to us in truth, we begin to grasp how far he is beyond our understanding.” As quoted in J. Scott Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Ch. 1 Revelation and Mystery, p. 24.
    [29] An OT name for “God, gods”; lit. “the powerful ones” or possibly “most high ones.” Furthermore, “Elohim is usually considered a ‘plural of majesty,’ as c. 100 other Hebrew terms; G. Knight defends the term as a ‘plural of intensity,’ in which the root significance is accentuated.” As quoted in J. Scott Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Names & Attributes of God, p. 1.
    [30] Also an OT name, translated as “master, lord, Lord”; lit. “my lords” or “my masters,” 449t, is on occasion translated “my Lord” (Ge 15:2; 18:3, Ps 35:23; cf. 110:1 “The Lord [YHWH] says to my Lord [‘adhonai’]”), normally this divine title is rendered simply “Lord” without any regard for the possessive suffix (“my”). Ibid., 2.
    [31] Also an OT name, YHWH, “probably pronounced Yahweh, 5,321t, called the tetragrammaton translated ‘LORD’, or ‘Jehovah.’ Most think YHWH is rooted in the verb ‘to be, become’ (hawa; Hb 5t; Ge 27:29; Ne 6:6; Ecc 2:22: 11:3; Isa 16:4), indicating existence or development, perhaps ‘He Is’; it is the standard verb for ‘to be’ in biblical Aramaic.” Ibid. Contra Frame, who treats “yahweh and Lord as equivalent, even though that equivalence in itself leaves open most questions about their meanings.” J. Frame, The Doctrine of God (P&R, 2002) 37.
    [32] This section intends to emphasize the intratrinitarian relationship of God. As such, not only attributes but also roles or actions might be expressed to define Persons of the Godhead.
    [33] James 2:19
    [34] In agreement with Gunton here, when he says: “God appears to be conceived neither as a collectivity nor as an individual, but as a communion, a unity of persons in relation.” C. Gunton, The One, the Three and the Many (Cambridge University Press, 1995) 215.
    [35] That is, “each member of the Godhead indwells or interpenetrates the other without confusion of personal distinction (Jn 14:9-11; 17:21).” As quoted in J. Scott Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Glossary of Trinitarian Terms, p. 5.
    [36] Hence, “God eternally exists as three persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and each person is fully God, and there is one God.” W. Grudem, Systematic Theology (Zondervan, 2000) 226. As well, while the Father and the Son are not as disputed to be deity, 2 Cor 3:18 seems to imply that the Spirit is deity also, since Paul refers to him as “the Lord who is the Spirit.”
    [37] Matt 3:17; 17:5; Jn 17:24; Eph 1:6; Col 1:13; Rom 15:30; Gal 5:22; On the problem of Lover/Beloved/Love language to describe the intra-relationship of the Trinity: I’m actually in agreement with both the Eastern as well as the Western Fathers on this point. Although there seems to be some tension with this language of “Love” describing the Person of the Holy Spirit, I believe there is some Scriptural warrant for it (see noted references). Language is definitely not perfect in its use of describing especially the Holy Spirit. But, I think that the Holy Spirit can still be affirmed (and described) as a Person, while at the same time affirming him as the very Being of Love who pours love into our hearts (Rom 5) and gifts the children of the Father with love (Gal 5), etc.
    [38] Jn. 14:26; 15:26; 16:7; In this sense of the Trinity being missional, the Father sent the Son into the world; and the Father and the Son sent the Spirit into the world. Likewise, after Jesus’ resurrection, he says to his disciples, “As the Father has sent me, even so I am sending you” (Jn 20:21b)
    [39] The Economic Trinity “is a view of the Trinity focused on the functional acts (economies) of the Godhead in the creation and salvation of the world; this perspective is distinguished from that of the Immanent Trinity (the Godhead in itself, transcendent, and outside all created reality).” As quoted in J. Scott Horrell’s unpublished class notes: Glossary of Trinitarian Terms, p. 3. In agreement with Karl Rahner’s statement, “The Trinity of the economy of salvation is the immanent Trinity and vice versa,” I don’t know that there should necessarily be a contradiction in the Trinity being both economic as well as immanent. Rahner quoted in Horrell’s unpublished Trinitarian Theologians, p. 5.
    [40] See first section, as each Person is equal in attributes and perfections, since the three are one God, not two.
    [41] Luke 10:22; Jn 14:7; Since the Son and the Father are equal in attributes and perfections, when you’ve seen the Son, you’ve seen the Father.
    [42] See endnote #2 concerning God the Father as Maker of heaven and earth.
    [43] Luke 10:21; See below concerning how we come to know God.
    [44] In other words, he is the fountainhead from which the Son is so-called eternally generated and the Holy Spirit proceeds.
    [45] Col 1:16; See also endnote #2 concerning the Son as one of God’s two hands in creating the universe.
    [46] Jn 17:3; 1 Jn 1:2; Jesus as the eternal life may not merely reflect his being the way to eternal life, but may also reflect his being an eternal Person who has existed from all eternity with the Father and the Spirit. See also Jn 1:1-2
    [47] Jesus was co-existent with the Father.
    [48] He was incarnate, literally, God “in the flesh.” Or, “the union of a human nature with the divine nature of the Son.” In the nature of the God-man, “the divine nature of the Son sustains the human nature (enhypostasis); there would not have been a baby Jesus without the Incarnation (anhypostasis). To borrow from the Apostles’ Creed, Jesus was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born of the virgin Mary. He was in the form of God and in the form of a servant; born in the likeness of men, and in human form. See also, Jn 1:1-2; 8:58; Titus 2:13; Heb 1:8; Phil 2:6-8.
    [49] See also endnote #1 on the Spirit as one of God’s two hands in the creation of the universe.
    [50] So, Gunton: “According to St. Basil, the distinctive function of the Spirit is to perfect the creation, and we can interpret this as meaning to bring to completion that for which each person and thing is created.” C. Gunton, The One, the Three and the Many (Cambridge University Press, 1995) 189.
    [51] From Anselm’s famous dictum: “For I do not seek to understand so that I may believe; but I believe so that I may understand. For I believe this also, that ‘unless I believe, I shall not understand.” [Isa. 7:9]. Anselm of Canterbury, The Major Works – Proslogion, p. 87. See also Heb. 1:3, where the writer confesses: “By faith we understand that the universe was created by the word of God…” In this heading of epistemology, I essentially declare that my belief in the Triune God is comprised of not merely intellectual knowledge, but it also consists of an affectionate moral component. Compare this concept with that in Rom. 1:18-25, where the devastating consequences of the Fall surface, and truth is suppressed about God by those who know him.
    [52] Also known as biblical revelation. Ps 19:7-11; Rom 1:18-25
    [53] Ps 19:7-11; that is, natural or general revelation
    [54] Rom 2; that is, a knowledge of God from the law on the heart.
    [55] “Whence come any knowledge of God…?” Karl Barth answered, “Only God can reveal knowledge of God.” So, Edwardsean theology declares: “So if there is knowledge of God communicated to any human understanding, this is God’s very own knowledge of himself, for that happens to be the only knowledge of God there is in heaven or on earth.” J. Edwards, The Works of Jonathan Edwards; v. 8, edited by Paul Ramsey (Yale University, 1989) 19-20.

  3. You know what is your problem ? You base your belief in the doctrine of men, and to their interpretation of the word of God. You believe them, when in fact, they are also morons of the bible. They may possess doctorate degree, or whatever degree they have, but you forgot one thing, God would never reveal HIS words to them. Understand the following verses :
    For ye see your calling, brethren, how that NOT MANY wise men after the flesh, NOT MANY mighty, NOT MANY noble, ARE CALLED.
    But GOD hath chosen THE FOOLISH THINGS of the world to confound THE WISE ; and God HATH CHOSEN THE WEAK THINGS of the world to confound THE THINGS THAT ARE MIGHTY .
    And BASE THINGS of the world, and THINGS WHICH ARE DESPISED, hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, TO BRING TO NOUGHT things that are. (I Corinthians 1:26-28)

    So you see, by these verses, you will understand that a man who possessess degree is not reliable and cannot be trusted, when it comes to interpreting the words of God in the bible.
    So, do not rely to much to these people when it comes to doctrines. BUT what you must do, is , to look for a preacher SENT BY GOD.
    If you are interested , I will give you the signs of how to spot a preacher sent by God that are written in the bible. Don’t remain a moron for the rest of your life.
    If you want to follow Jesus Christ, this is THE ADVICE of Jeremiah :
    TO TURN ASIDE THE RIGHT OF A MAN BEFORE THE FACE OF THE MOST HIGH. (Lamentation 3:35)

    LEARN by us NOT TO GO beyond what is written. (I Corinthians 4:6)

  4. I appreciate your concern, however:

    1) If I listen to you, then I should not listen to your comments on the Bible.

    2) The apostle Paul himself exemplifies one who found wisdom from those not necessarily “sent by God” (Acts 17.28).

    3) It seems that, at least as observed from your words, you yourself do not listen to the very Word you are straining to uphold. The most important thing is love (1 Cor 13). If what you speak is truth, speak it in love (Eph 4.15), as if you were speaking to me face to face; and, if what you speak is truth, speak it in love, as if you were speaking to those I quote face to face. After all, I and those I quoted (for the most part) are of the same body I assume you profess to be. Jesus died for all. Jesus has risen for all. Jesus is Lord of all. Therefore, let us, as his body, lovingly make much of him in living out and pursuing truth.

  5. Dove,

    Please explain how what you think the Bible says is not just a person’s interpretation, but somehow other people’s opinions are interpretations. You’re not making any sense. Are you claiming some sort of special revelation from God so that you understand the Bible perfectly? Do not all Christians possess the Spirit, and therefore should be able to understand it truly as you do? If so, what do we do with disagreements?

    Unfortunately, you are showing yourself to be a fool in every sense of the word. You refuse to love the Lord your God with all your mind, which is sin. Do not so quickly spit on the graves of men who did. In your arrogance you have allowed yourself to be separated by the Enemy from the wisdom of the Christian community across the ages, the priesthood of all believers, and basically anything that would protect you from the self-centered, isolated delusion that you are now living. Brother, (and I do believe you are a fellow Christian) you are in very serious trouble spiritually. Do not take lightly the depths of your current deception.

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