The Way I See It #230

“Heaven is totally overrated. It seems boring. Clouds, listening to people play the harp. It should be somewhere you can’t wait to go, like a luxury hotel. Maybe blue skies and soft music were enough to keep people in line in the 17th century, but Heaven has to step it up a bit. They’re basically getting by because they only have to be better than Hell.”

— Joel Stein

Columnist for the Los Angeles Times.

This is the author’s opinion, not necessarily that of Starbucks.

To read more or respond, go to http://www.starbucks.com/wayiseeit.

The one phrase Mr. Stein got right: “[Heaven] should be somewhere you can’t wait to go.”


The Way I See It #280

You can learn a lot more from listening than you can from talking. Find someone with whom you don’t agree in the slightest and ask them to explain themselves at length. Then take a seat, shut your mouth, and don’t argue back. It’s physically impossible to listen with your mouth open.

— John Moe

Radio host and author of Conservatize Me.

This is the author’s opinion, not necessarily that of Starbucks.

To read more or respond, go to http://www.starbucks.com/wayiseeit.


biblical reflection: “…let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger [(due possibly to disagreement)].” James the Just, the brother of Jesus

The Way I See It #58

I have faith. Faith in our wondrous capacity for hope and good, love and trust, healing and forgiveness. Faith in the blessing of our infinite ability to wonder, question, pray, feel, think and learn. I have faith. Faith in the infinite possibilities of the human spirit.

— James Brown

Emmy winning sportscaster and co-host of FOX NFL Sunday.


This is the author’s opinion, not necessarily that of Starbucks.

To read more or respond, go to http://www.starbucks.com/wayiseeit.

The Way I See It #51

Americans spend an average of 29 hours a week watching television — which means in a typical life span we devote 13 uninterrupted years to our TV sets! The biggest problem with mass media isn’t low quality — it’s high quantity. Cutting down just an hour a day would provide extra years of life — for music and family, exercise and reading, conversation and coffee.

— Michael Medved

Author of Right Turns and radio talk show host.

This is the author’s opinion, not necessarily that of Starbucks.

To read more or respond, go to http://www.starbucks.com/wayiseeit.