God Withholds No Good Thing From Us

I believe in a blessing I don’t understand
I’ve seen rain fall on wicked and the just
Rain is no measure of his faithfulness
He withholds no good thing from us
No good thing from us, no good thing from us

I believe in a peace that flows deeper than pain
That broken find healing in love
Pain is no measure of his faithfulness
He withholds no good thing from us
No good thing from us, no good thing from us

I will open my hands, will open my heart
I will open my hands, will open my heart
I am nodding my head an emphatic yes
To all that You have for me

I believe in a fountain that will never dry
Though I’ve thirsted and didn’t have enough
Thirst is no measure of his faithfulness
He withholds no good thing from us
No good thing from us, no good thing from us

I will open my hands, will open my heart
I will open my hands, will open my heart
I am nodding my head an emphatic yes
To all that You have for me

No good thing from us, no good thing from us
He withholds no good thing from us

I will open my hands, will open my heart
I will open my hands, will open my heart
I am nodding my head an emphatic yes
To all that You have for me

“Open My Hands” ~ Sara Groves

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Jonathan Edwards’s Theology: A Reinterpretation

Grasping Edwards’s true vocation as a theologian enables us to see that Edwards’s thought is, ultimately, theologically oriented. Along these lines, I suggest that the Jonathan Edwards of history is the Jonathan Edwards found in his corpus — a Reformed theologian, pastor, apologist and missionary who interpreted all reality through the lens of the gospel and, ultimately, God’s own life, what Edwards depicted as ‘the supreme harmony of all.’

 Jonathan Edwards’s Theology: A Reinterpretation, Kyle Strobel

Edwards on the Trinity

Everything Edwards wrote about the Trinity expresses the intertwining connectedness of the Trinity and the Christian’s experience of God as the Creator, Savior, and Sanctifier, and thus between the immanent and the economic Trinity.

~ Sang Hyun Lee, Editor’s Introduction, Works Vol 21

The Two Books

How great a person then must [Jesus] be for whose coming into the world the great God of heaven and earth, and governor of all things, spent four thousand years in preparing the way for his coming, going about it soon after the world was created, and from age to age doing great things, bringing mighty events to pass, accomplishing wonders without number, often overturning the world in order to it, and causing everything in the state of mankind, and all revolutions and changes in the habitable world, from generation to generation, to be subservient to this great design. Surely this must be some great and extraordinary person indeed, and a great work indeed it must [necessarily] be, that he is coming about.

Edwards, The History of the Work of Redemption (Yale, 9:292).

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